Is Your Foot Fracture An Early Sign of Osteoporosis?

Unexplained foot fractures may be the first sign of osteoporosis, a bone thinning disease which affects over 28 million Americans and  accounts for 1.5 million bone fractures a year.

Osteoporosis is frequently referred to as the “Silent crippler” since it often progresses without any symptoms or isn’t diagnosed until a person experiences pain from a bone fracture.   The porous nature of bones in people with osteoporosis make them more susceptible to bone fractures, especially in the feet.   Because the bones are in a weakened state, normal weight-bearing actions like walking can cause the bones in the foot to break.   In fact, many patients visit their podiatrist suffering from foot pain only to find out they actually have a stress fracture, without having experienced an injury.

Podiatrists are able to diagnose osteoporosis through bone densitometry tests, which measure calcium and mineral levels in the bones through low-dose radiation x-ray, or possible through a routine x-ray.  This is why prevention and early intervention are key; women should make sure bone densitometry tests are part of their wellness examinations when indicated by their physicians.

If you are diagnosed with osteoporosis, it’s important to protect your feet from stress fractures.   Wear shoes that provide support and cushioning, such as athletic running shoes, to provide extra shock absorption and protection.   Custom orthotics may also be recommended to protect the foot from pressure and provide shock absorption, particularly during exercise.

If you are suffering from a foot fracture, the podiatrists’ at North Eastern Ohio Podiatry Group, LLC can help provide the best treatment options for your condition.

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The scope of our practice includes, but is not limited to treating disorders of the foot and ankle, their joints, tendons, ligaments, bones, skin, and other soft tissues. We also treat deformities of a chronic nature, developmental abnormalities, problems of wear and tear in the human foot and ankle, and complications of diabetes and poor circulation
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